Category Archives: Caregiving

Full Time Caregiving – Is It Time?

Determining if the time is right for your loved one to have full time caregiving can be difficult.  The burden to make that decision usually falls upon family members to recognize the signs that their aging parents may need some help.  At Caregivers Connection, we have some questions to help you make that determination. Continue reading

Six Medication Safety Tips

At Caregivers Connection, we are aware that one of your greatest concerns is the safety of your loved one.  Whether or not they are properly taking their medication is probably high on the list of things you think about when you are not with them.  Here’s six medication safety tips that are easy for you, and them, to follow. Continue reading

Three Common Challenges of Caregiving

According to former First Lady, Rosalyn Carter; “There are only four kinds of people in the world – those who have been caregivers, those who are currently caregivers, those who will be caregivers and those who will need caregivers.”  In other words, at some point, everyone will face the challenges of being a caregiver. We at Caregivers Connections, have put together a list of three common challenges of caregiving, along with some tips to handle each successfully. Continue reading

Four Tips To Increase Mobility

As your loved one ages, it’s common for them to experience a loss of mobility. When they’ve spent their entire lives unaided, learning to walk with a walker, cane or even using a wheelchair is a struggle. As a caregiver, it may be hard to know how to help them. At Caregivers Connection, we would like to offer four tips that can encourage them to increase their mobility. Continue reading

Five Tips To Avoid Caregiver Burnout

As a caregiver, you’ve more than likely heard: ‘take care of yourself’, ‘your health is important to your loved one’, and other thoughtful words along that line.  The problem is, many shrug it off thinking, ‘I don’t have the time to take care of myself’. The truth is, it’s important to take care of yourself. Here are five steps to help you avoid caregiver burnout. Continue reading

The History Of Labor Day

Labor Day, the first Monday in September, is a creation of the labor movement and is dedicated to the social and economic achievements of American workers. It constitutes a yearly national tribute to the contributions workers have made to the strength, prosperity, and well-being of our country. Labor Day also symbolizes the end of summer for many Americans, and is celebrated with parties, parades and athletic events. Continue reading

Five Walking Benefits For Senior Citizens

Use it or lose it.  This is the word from doctors recently when talking to senior citizens about their bodies.  The good news is, seniors needn’t think they have to sign up for 10K races, high-impact aerobics, or heavy weight training. Instead, walking benefits them by keeping them physically strong and agile.  Adding a simple 35-minute walk a day is all it takes.

According to Dr. Michael Pratt, the acting chief for the Physical Activity and Heath Branch in the Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, walking is a tremendously good activity for senior citizens. It’s cheap, simple, and almost anybody can do it.  Walking has a number of health benefits for everyone.  For seniors especially, it helps them maintain mobility and their independence.

Walking BenefitsFive benefits of walking:

1) Improves circulation: Women who walked 30 minutes a day reduced their risk of stroke by 20 percent – by 40 percent when they stepped up the pace, according to researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston.

2) Strengthens your bones: It can stop the loss of bone mass for those with osteoporosis, according to Michael A. Schwartz, MD, of Plancher Orthopedics & Sports Medicine in New York.

3) It supports your joints: Since our joints don’t get any blood supply, they rely on synovial or joint fluid that circulates as we move, which carries oxygen to them. Without walking, joints are deprived of life-giving fluid, which can speed deterioration.

4) It lightens the mood: Walking releases natural pain­killing endorphins to the body – this is just one of the emotional benefits of exercise.

5) It helps you do more, longer.  Since walking helps circulation, keeps the bones strong and healthy, and lightens your mood, the body stays healthy longer, increasing the ability to be more active as we age.

With that being said, when is a good time to start a walking program?  Now! Perhaps they can’t begin with 30 minutes, however, they can start somewhere.  Walking benefits the body in so many ways, so go out and enjoy your walk.  Even when the weather isn’t the greatest, lacing up your shoes and heading to a mall is a perfect way to keep moving.