Tag Archives: Assisted living

Long-Term Planning Care Talks Should Start Today

Most individuals hope to be able to age in place. If your parents or other loved ones have that thought as well, there are steps that can be, and should be, taken to make certain that dream can be realized.

It’s a fact of life that we simply do not know what the next day will bring. From suffering a stroke, a trip or fall accident or some other illness or injury, your loved one may go from being independent to being reliant on friends and family or being in the care of physicians. Planning now – today as a matter of fact – to make your home senior-friendly can help you realize the dream of aging in place. Consider too, that an illness or injury could mean you or your elderly loved one could require care for a limited or a long-term commitment, having a conversation today and putting measures in place will relieve much of the stress that arises when the need is imminent.

At some point in almost every person’s life he or she will need personal care above and beyond what a family member may be able to provide. The National Institutes on Health estimate that as many as 70% of all individuals 65-years-old or older will need long-term care assistance.

Here are some items to take into consideration when planning for long-term care, whether it will be in home or in a skilled facility setting:

Where will you want to be cared for and who can provide the care?

  • In-home personal care aide? You can hire a professional to come into the home and care for an aging loved one. These individuals can provide health care and even help around the house with cooking meals and running errands. A personal care aide can help with bathing and other self care issues.
  • Senior day programs are provided to adults in a community setting and offer meals, social interaction and activities and are an ideal setting for individuals that require help during the day. These programs may even offer occupational or physical therapy as well as transportation and are ideal for individuals who are able to be alone at night but need assistance during the day.
  • Senior housing/assisted living settings provide amenities the same as you’d have in your own home but the units also offer housekeeping, access to medical personnel, exercise, activities and help with bathing and other personal care needs.
  • A nursing home is a setting in which 24-hour care is provided. These settings are for individuals unable to care for themselves whether from an illness or injury.
  • Staying in the home is made even more feasible if the home is equipped with a medical alert device and your loved with one with a personal medical alert device. These devices not only offer peace of mind when your loved one is home alone but also provide them with immediate access to emergency medical care if the need arises.

The level of care you or your elderly relative needs will hinge on the circumstances, the level of care a family member needs and the level that other family members feel comfortable providing.

Here are questions that all family members should be involved in when making decisions on long-term care:

  • What level of service will be required?
  • Is there a family member that is willing to take on the role of caregiver?
  • Is there special assistance that will be needed?
  • Is the home senior-friendly? By this we mean, has the bathroom been modified to the needs of a senior (grab bars in the shower, raised toilet seats, etc). Is the kitchen set up so that the senior doesn’t need to climb in order to reach cooking items? Are the rugs non slip? Are there clear pathways to and from the rooms? Are hallways equipped with motion sensor or easy to reach light switches?
  • What does the family doctor recommend for the level of care the senior needs?
  • Are there long-term care or assisted living facilities in the area that have open beds? Remember, if your loved one moves into an assisted living setting, his or her personal medical device can move right along with them and offer an additional layer of care and peace of mind protection.
  • What kind of insurance or other savings are available to pay for the long term care needs?

Taking time now to research options and have open discussions on the needs, wants and desires of the seniors in your life will make it easier for you to make decisions on their behalf (if necessary) when a health need arises. Making life decisions when in the midst of a crisis situation could lead to stress and uncertainty.

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Taking Steps Toward A Move To Assisted Living

The move to an assisted living facility or to a smaller home means that you will need to sort through a lifetime of memories and collectibles. Making decisions on what to keep, what to give away and what to toss can be a difficult and trying time for both the caregiver and the senior. Because possessions have so much meaning, downsizing can be an emotional endeavor and is one that must be undertaken with care and empathy.

Items that still have a purpose and are useful should be kept. In reality, though, the senior truly needs to look at all the items with a critical eye and ask: When did I use this item last? Is there someone else that will benefit from it? Making a move to a new space requires letting go of not only personal possessions such as collectible items but perhaps even furniture that is too large for a smaller apartment.

Here are some tips for working with the senior in your life – or for the senior that is looking to make a move on his or her own – on how to downsize with ease:

  1. Go into the downsizing project with realistic expectations. You need to be sensitive to your loved ones feelings about the move as well as the need to part with possessions. Put yourself in their position when it comes to parting with items. Prior to the packing and the move, set goals for it and for the downsizing process. There may need to be compromises along the way.
  2. Your loved one won’t have to part with all the items that hold a special place in their hearts, but they do need to take steps to simplify their lives and that is part of the reasoning behind the move.
  3. What looks old to you, holds special significance to your loved one. The dingy blanket on your dad’s bed may look like it should be headed for the trash but to your dad it is the first gift your mother made him for their first anniversary. Sentimental value of possessions cannot be diminished.
  4. Take time for working through the downsizing process. Make certain you set aside enough time, perhaps a week, to go through the items. Prepare to be frustrated at times, but remember, this is a life changing event for your loved one.
  5. Rushed decisions will likely be regretted and resentments can set in. If your mom is wavering on an item to either keep or toss, set it aside and put it into storage for a time. If it’s in storage and your mom has forgotten about it, then after a month’s time, feel free to bring the item up and make a decision on its disposition at that time.
  6. Grieving is a natural part of disposing of personal possessions. Take photos of sentimental items that your loved decides to part with to provide them with a physical representation of the item without its bulk. Keep in mind that the era in which your parents were raised was one of frugality and the idea of throwing away a “perfectly good” item goes against their upbringing.
  7. Celebrate the task once it’s done. Celebrate at the end of each day of packing and acknowledge the progress you’ve made rather than looking at how much you have left.

A move can be a traumatic event for both you and your loved one and is a task that needs to be undertaken with care and tact and with the idea that the move is an exciting new chapter in their lives.

 

Preparing To Move An Aging Parent Into Your Home

At some point, it may become necessary to open the doors of your home and invite your aging parents to move in; whether they’ve suffered a stroke, trip or fall accident, other health issue or if old age has simply made it impossible for them to live alone, family members need to have a plan in place. Whether your aging relatives will move into an assisted living facility or in with a family member, discussions should begin before the need arises avoiding the stress that comes with making difficult decisions in a time of crisis.

If your aging parents have the resources to move into an assisted living or retirement community, that may be the least stressful option for all involved. If, however, they don’t have the resources to pay for that level of care, the decision must be made on whether they can continue to age in place or whether they will move into the home of one of their children. Moving in with a family member would potentially free up resources that could be used to pay for a part time caregiver.

No matter how much you love and get along with your elderly parents, moving them into your family home changes the dynamic. If their health is failing, you may need to make decisions on who the primary caregiver will be and will need to involve siblings in their daily care. Caregiver stress and isolation is amplified once you’ve moved your aging loved one into your home as it may seem as though there is no escape – depending on your age, you could be holding down a job, raising your own children, and now you’re the primary caregiver for your elderly parents; you may fall into what’s called the Sandwich Generation.

Consider too, that your aging parent may not want to be a burden on the family and they may balk at the idea of moving into your home. If you’re being thrust into the role of caregiver, and have no medical knowledge or background, you may feel apprehensive at the idea of caring for an aging, infirm parent.

Just as you had to baby proof your home when you had children, you will need to age proof the home if your aging parents move in. Here are some areas that will need to be addressed to make certain the home is safe for an aging individual:

  • Prevent falls in every room of the house beginning with the bathroom because this is the most dangerous room for the elderly. Install grip rails and non-skid strips in the bathtub and shower. Make certain the rugs are tacked down or are non-skid styles. If possible install an elevated toilet seat or install toilet seat arm rests to make it easier for them to get up and down.
  • Check the house for trip and fall hazards. Move obstacles out of the line of traffic by rearranging furniture. Make certain that long hallways are lighted either through the use of motion sensor nightlights or lights that turn on when the ambient light is low enough. Again, check that rugs are backed with non slip strips and that power cords are stowed out of the way.
  • If the home has steps, you may need to install a ramp to make it easier for your relative to navigate. Moving your elderly relative into a first floor room is the best idea, but if that’s not possible you may need to install a chair lift to get from the first floor to the bedroom. If they use a walker  your doorways will need to be wide enough to accommodate it.
  • Chair lifts for couches or recliners will make it easier for your relatives to get on and off the furniture.
  • Home medical alert equipment provides peace of mind for your relative and for you, as the caregiver. A medical alert device allows the caregiver to feel more comfortable and confident of leaving the home and leaving their parent alone because they can rest assured that in the event of a trip or fall or medical emergency their relative can summon medical assistance at the push of a button.
  • Make the bedroom that your parents will move into a welcoming spot. If the room is large enough move in a chair so they don’t feel they have to sit on the bed to watch television. Speaking of televisions, provide them with their own, this gives them the option of watching shows they enjoy and also gives you and your family privacy to watch your own shows. Install wall rails to help them walk around their room, if mobility is an issue. If they have a hard time getting in and out of bed, install an adjustable bed rail to make it easier. Make certain their room has motion sensor lights so when they get out of bed, they don’t have to fumble for a wall switch.
  • Make the kitchen more elderly-friendly by moving food items and kitchenware to shelves that your parents can easily reach without having to stretch, strain or climb onto a chair. Set aside a shelf in the refrigerator or a cupboard where they can store items they specifically enjoy having on hand.

Regardless of the relationship between child and aging parent, moving them into your home will bring challenges. With open lines of communication though, you can make your home a welcome refuge and provide your elderly parent with a place in which they can feel secure and loved.

 

 

 

How Will You Pay For Assisted Living Expenses?

As you age, finding ways to pay for the eventual need for assisted living becomes a more pressing concern. Individuals make plans for their Golden Years and retirement with the assumption that they will remain healthy and be able to age in place. Many people fail to plan for what it would cost if assisted living becomes a necessity for one or both of the partners in the marriage.

The costs for assisted living can very quickly dissolve a savings account and leave you wondering how to pay the expenses and this could potentially fall to the children. Planning for the possibility of assisted living arrangements should be done while making plans for retirement. There are various levels of assisted living facilities and the costs, which include:

  • The size of the living space desired
  • The level of healthcare needed
  • The location of the community
  • The amenities provided

In many cases, the costs associated with assisted living are paid for out of pocket or through a combination of Social Security, Veterans benefits or other pension funds as well as savings.

There are ways to plan for the time when you or your relatives may no longer be able to age in place and need more assistance with day to day living.

When making plans for retirement and beyond, here are some things to look into for paying for assisted living:

  • Long term care insurance is a private paid insurance option that can pay for assisted living expenses. The earlier these policies are purchased, the less expensive the premiums. The prices and coverages can vary dramatically depending on the company from which it’s purchased. The premium will also be based on the age, health and level of coverage desired. Read the fine print to see what will be covered and what needs to happen to be able to access the coverage.
  • Medicaid, a government-run program, may assist with certain bills associated with assisted living as each state determines the way in which Medicaid is implemented. The levels of assistance provided are based on the individual’s net worth and income level. Medicaid is typically provided to individuals who have few economic resources or those who are disabled.
  • Medicare is another government program which provides limited assistance to individuals. It typically will pay for care that is deemed medically necessary and may even provide funds to pay for professional caregivers.
  • Veterans benefits, designed for qualified veterans and their spouses, can help with qualified assistance living expenses. Call the local Veteran’s affairs office to see whether this tax-free pension benefit can help.

As with any life event it’s best to plan early for care needed as you age. Making decisions while under pressure or in crisis mode makes the decisions more difficult and may leave information on paying for assisted living expenses unexplored.

 

 

 

 

Tips For Having Money Talks With Aging Parents

 

Having a discussion about money with your parents is one of those subjects that most adult children dread. While it’s uncomfortable for both child and parent alike, financial issues need to be discussed as you take a more active role in their care.

 

As parents age, they face the potential of having to move into an assisted living facility or a nursing home and because of this, candid discussions need to be held regarding the state of your parents’ financial affairs. Because it’s likely that your parents don’t want to consider a move into an assisted living facility, one way to help them age in place is to talk with them about purchasing a home medical alert device. These devices provide your aging relatives with a medical alert pendant that can be activated in the event of a trip or fall accident or other health emergency in the home. These devices are also a cost effective way to provide peace of mind for all members of the family.

 

In the event though, that your parents are unable to live alone or if they suffer a fall and need to spend time in a rehabilitation facility, you need to be aware of the state of their finances before this becomes necessary. The time to discuss money is before your family is in the midst of a health crisis. Taking time to talk with your parents about their savings, their monthly debt and their assets as well as where their financial information is kept and what banks, attorneys or accountants they use is crucial to your ability to help them in the time of need. Depending on the age and health of your parents, you may also want to be proactive in working with them on preparing a will, a healthcare proxy and even power of attorney paperwork. Planning ahead will eliminate confusion and allow a family member to seamlessly step in and make certain your parent’s bills are paid and that you have access to their financial records if you have to make difficult decisions.

Here are five tips to consider before your aging relatives are in need of long term care or medical assistance:

  1. Make certain you understand the differences between Medicaid and Medicare and what each of these programs will pay for. Also, make certain your aging relatives are receiving these benefits if they are eligible.
  2. Begin looking into the long term care and assisted living facilities in your area in the event one is needed.
  3. Speak with your parent’s legal and financial team if they have one. You will want to understand how a stay in an assisted living or nursing home will impact their finances – especially the finances of the parent who may be able to remain in the home.
  4. Check with your own employer to gauge the policy on taking time off to care for an aging relative. Consider too, how taking time off from work, transporting your relatives to doctor’s appointments, etc. will impact your own finances.
  5. Talk with your family members and come up with a plan for long term care needs for your aging relatives. Work out a schedule as to who will assist with caregivin

While these conversations may be difficult to initiate, you need to be prepared prior to an emergency situation; operating from a crisis mode only adds to the inherent stress of the situation.

 

Taking Charge Of Senior Living Accommodations

Before your children are faced with the decision of “where will Mom and Dad live when they can no longer remain at home” you can begin looking into housing options. When faced with retirement and aging, seniors should be taking an active role in making a determination on where they will spend their Golden Years. After all, you’ve worked hard for decades and now is the time to decide whether you want to remain in the family home, travel the country, or even decide where you would like to live out your Golden Years – an ocean front assisted living space, an independent living facility that overlooks a golf course, or any number of other choices.

Once you’ve retired you may be faced with the question of, “What’s next?” Rather than being frozen in place when looking into the future, you should take time and make a list of what it is you want to do that perhaps you never had time to do while pursuing your career and raising your family. Has golf always been a passion? Do you enjoy sitting on a deck overlooking the water? Is the idea of living in a small town that you’d visited on vacation appeal as a long term solution? Chances are, regardless of your passions and hobbies, you can find an assisted living or independent living facility to suit your needs.

If you’ve made a decision to sell the family home and move to an independent living facility you may want to decide whether you’re moving closer to a particular family member or somewhere that is far from all your children. There will come a time when you will need to rely on family, especially as you age. Meanwhile, equipping your home with a home medical alarm system, is a great solution that can even move with you an assisted living facility. Having access to your medical alert device, even in an assisted living setting, provides an additional layer of protection and peace of mind.

Tell your children that you’re making a move because you simply don’t want to keep up with home maintenance and the higher utility bills that come with home ownership. Let them know where you’re considering moving and get their buy in on your decision. Chances are they will embrace your decision as it frees them from having to make tough choices on your behalf in later years.

The money you make from the sale of your home and the downsizing of your personal belongings can certainly be used to finance your new lifestyle in an independent living facility or assisted living community. If you’re healthy, energetic, physically active and mentally sharp, moving into one of these communities will provide outlets for socialization while allowing you the freedom of independence in your own apartment-type setting.

“Retirement living” has taken on an entirely new meaning in recent years as the aging population continues to remain active and are taking a more active role in their care as they age. Begin your search by determining what area of the country you’d like to live in then narrow down the search by looking at the amenities offered by the various locations. Spend time visiting these facilities – think of it as a mini-vacation – before making any life-altering decisions.

Chances are you will find that while amenities vary from facility to facility, most independent living communities cater to seniors looking for an active lifestyle and will provide recreational opportunities and access to sports such as golf or swimming. If you’ve always had a love of cooking or crafting or painting, look for an independent living community that caters to those hobbies as well.

The camaraderie you find at an independent living community can go a long way in making your Golden Years shine. By being active and involved you will be working to enhance both your physical and mental health and remain capable of aging in place for decades to come.

Taking Charge Of Senior Living Accommodations

Before your children are faced with the decision of “where will Mom and Dad live when they can no longer remain at home” you can begin looking into housing options. When faced with retirement and aging, seniors should be taking an active role in making a determination on where they will spend their Golden Years. After all, you’ve worked hard for decades and now is the time to decide whether you want to remain in the family home, travel the country, or even decide where you would like to live out your Golden Years – an ocean front assisted living space, an independent living facility that overlooks a golf course, or any number of other choices.

Once you’ve retired you may be faced with the question of, “What’s next?” Rather than being frozen in place when looking into the future, you should take time and make a list of what it is you want to do that perhaps you never had time to do while pursuing your career and raising your family. Has golf always been a passion? Do you enjoy sitting on a deck overlooking the water? Is the idea of living in a small town that you’d visited on vacation appeal as a long term solution? Chances are, regardless of your passions and hobbies, you can find an assisted living or independent living facility to suit your needs.

If you’ve made a decision to sell the family home and move to an independent living facility you may want to decide whether you’re moving closer to a particular family member or somewhere that is far from all your children. There will come a time when you will need to rely on family, especially as you age. Meanwhile, equipping your home with a home medical alarm system, is a great solution that can even move with you an assisted living facility. Having access to your medical alert device, even in an assisted living setting, provides an additional layer of protection and peace of mind.

Tell your children that you’re making a move because you simply don’t want to keep up with home maintenance and the higher utility bills that come with home ownership. Let them know where you’re considering moving and get their buy in on your decision. Chances are they will embrace your decision as it frees them from having to make tough choices on your behalf in later years.

The money you make from the sale of your home and the downsizing of your personal belongings can certainly be used to finance your new lifestyle in an independent living facility or assisted living community. If you’re healthy, energetic, physically active and mentally sharp, moving into one of these communities will provide outlets for socialization while allowing you the freedom of independence in your own apartment-type setting.

“Retirement living” has taken on an entirely new meaning in recent years as the aging population continues to remain active and are taking a more active role in their care as they age. Begin your search by determining what area of the country you’d like to live in then narrow down the search by looking at the amenities offered by the various locations. Spend time visiting these facilities – think of it as a mini-vacation – before making any life-altering decisions.

Chances are you will find that while amenities vary from facility to facility, most independent living communities cater to seniors looking for an active lifestyle and will provide recreational opportunities and access to sports such as golf or swimming. If you’ve always had a love of cooking or crafting or painting, look for an independent living community that caters to those hobbies as well.

The camaraderie you find at an independent living community can go a long way in making your Golden Years shine. By being active and involved you will be working to enhance both your physical and mental health and remain capable of aging in place for decades to come.

Aging In Place Is Possible With Pre-Planning

Your elderly parents are comfortable in their home and don’t have the desire to move to a smaller house or into assisted living but you and your other family members are worried about their safety, especially as they get older.

Opting for in-home care for your parents is a perfect bridge from living completely alone to moving to an assisted living facility. Additionally, when your parents are in need of additional “supervision” setting up their home with a medical alert pendant increases the security the whole family feels. With a home medical alert device, your relative simply needs to press the button on the pendant and that sets in motion a call from the medical alert provider and the dispatching of emergency medical personnel if necessary.

Receiving in-home care offers your aging loved ones the ability to remain both comfortable and independent in the surroundings to which they’ve become accustomed. Also, when you hire in-home care, your parents may remain at home for a longer period of time simply because they are in familiar surroundings and can still take care of themselves and their home. An in-home care provider allows your relatives to age in place, offers the primary caregiver respite and can also assist your relatives with daily tasks such as personal care and housekeeping.

In-home care providers offer myriad services ranging from medical care to housekeeping, cooking, taking your parents to doctor’s appointments and simply providing company. The need of your relatives will determine the level of care and this will also help you to determine the skills and training necessary for the in-home care provider. You can work out a schedule with the provider that suits both the needs of your aging parents as well as the needs and schedules of family caregivers; in-home care support can be a seamless bridge between visits by family members just as the home medical alert device offers peace of mind for those times when your aging relatives are home alone.

When you consider that in-home help is more a necessity than a luxury you may be better able to get buy in from family members and from your parents themselves. Bear in mind that your relatives may be hesitant to have a stranger come into their home.

Explain these benefits to both family members as well as your parents when you’re in the midst of making these arrangements:

  • Home caregivers appreciate your relative’s need for independence and can be as involved as you, and your parents, feel necessary. They can simply be there to lighten the day-to-day burdens of cooking, housekeeping and running of errands.
  • Being in familiar surroundings will keep the seniors in your life more mentally, emotionally and physically alert.
  • In-home care is more cost effective than facilitated living.
  • Care can be given in an environment that is less stressful for your aging relative. If one or more of your aging relatives is recovering from an illness, aging at home will likely hasten their recovery.

When you consider that the idea of giving up independence and a family home will cause your aging loved ones stress and could even lead to emotional issues, there truly is no place like home for your relatives to be and in-home caregivers make that a possibility.

A Home Away From Home for Aging Parents

If your parents are like most adults, they imagined living in their own home for their entire lives. In many cases though, this just isn’t possible even if you upgrade the home with senior-friendly amenities. It’s hard for anyone to give up control, but it’s even more difficult for aging individuals when they see their independence slipping away. Add the fact that they may need to divest themselves of many of their personal belongings if they move into assisted living and their fear and disappointment increases.

In many cases the move to an assisted living facility likely means that one of your senior relatives has been struck with an illness that will no longer allow them to live independently so they are likely in need of more medical assistance than a family member can provide.

Family members are terrified of their aging parents’ attempts to remain independent and age in place; on the flip side, your parents are scared at the idea of living in a foreign location and giving up their independence. When you discuss options with them and tour assisted and senior living facilities, you both will see that an assisted living situation is truly not much different from living at home. The added benefit is that your relative will have ease of access to medical assistance if needed.

If your aging parent has had a home medical monitoring device, remember that the device can move along with them to their new place of residence. Your aging relative will be able to wear his or her medical alert pendant because even though an assisted living facility has medical professionals on staff, if your parent suffers an illness or a slip and fall, activating the pendant will alert emergency personnel and offer assistance per your private care plan.

Another plus of assisted living housing is that not only will your aging relatives continue to have independence, they will also have access to social and community activities and remaining active is one of the many things that seniors must do to stay healthy. Assisted living facilities are also fully equipped and senior-friendly with cupboards that leave items within reach, bathrooms that are equipped for ease of bathing by individuals who may have difficulties navigating their former bathrooms and other amenities. Your parents can certainly also move in the furniture from their current home to lend their new apartment the feeling of their former home.

4 Alternatives to Assisted Living

Host A Family Meeting To Make Elder Care Decisions

Making tough decisions on the health and welfare of your aging parents is difficult. You may want to gather all family members who will be impacted by the decision and have a family meeting. While it’s true that geography may make the logistics of this difficult, consider gathering family that lives local and hosting a web cam chat with those that are not geographically local.

Having a network of concerned family members might make the decision-making process easier. If you find that your aging parents are facing specific health issues it is best to share information and share thoughts in a group setting. In some cases, there may be a family member or two that is bearing the burden of caring for the aging relative and they may simply need help in the care-giving tasks. Caring for an aging relative is never an easy task and you’ll find that holding a caregiver/family meeting can improve the situation.

Invite family members that will be directly impacted by decisions made on behalf of your aging relatives – whether monetarily or through increased care-giving roles. While you may think it’s easier and likely more comfortable to exclude the aging relative from the conversation, you should gather their input and make them feel part of the solution. You may be surprised to find out that what you think is important and of concern is vastly different from their perspective!

The professional caregiver or another individual who interacts with the aging relatives on a daily basis should also be present for the meeting.  If your relatives are heavily involved in their church or other organization there may be a friend or two that know your loved one well and should be included in the meeting.  Ensuring you have all the appropriate people at the meeting can help make the decision-making process more effective.

 What’s the meeting about?

Now that you’ve planned a meeting, what will you talk about? You should first appoint one family member as the meeting organizer and another to take notes. Start by asking your parents what issues they feel they are facing. For example:

  • Are they scared to live alone?
  • Are they afraid of falling or worried about failing health issues and what that might mean to them?
  • Are they worried that their home is no longer suited to their needs?
  • Are they worried about tripping or falling in their home or yard?
  • Are they worried about their medical conditions?

These are just a few of the concerns your loved one might have.

Once you’ve listened to your aging relative’s concerns you can address them one by one. For example:

  • Consider outside agencies to provide assistance such as a Meals-on-Wheels, a housekeeper or an in-home medical professional.
  • Gather the family to make the home safer by removing trip and fall obstacles?
  • Evaluate the cost and benefits of renovating the bathroom, shower and kitchen to make it more senior-friendly?
  • Install motion sensors or lights that operate dusk to dawn to light the exterior of the home.
  • Add nightlights the home to illuminate the interior of the home.
  • Research a security system to be installed in the home to make them feel safer?
  • Equip your love one with a home medical alert system so they have 24/7 access to emergency care.

Following the meeting make certain that the action steps that were discussed are actually implemented. Keep in touch with your loved ones via telephone or face to face visits to check on their health and well-being. Preparation and prevention are two of the most vital steps in alleviating fears and providing safety for your loved ones.

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