Tag Archives: Baby boomer

Living to 100

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, over 50,000 people in the United States were 100 years or age or older! It is further expected that the number of people over 100 years old will reach 110,000 by 2037 and those over 80 will reach six million by that same year.

So what is the secret?

Centenarians (folks who reach 100 or older) say that exercise, healthy eating and a good night’s sleep help!  Here are a few other suggestions that may help you live a longer, fuller life.

  • Eat, Pray and Exercise!   More than 80% of centenarians say they eat nutritiously balanced meals almost daily compared to 68% of boomers. Furthermore, these folks said that they pray, meditate or have some sort of “spiritual” activity and more than half of each group claims to exercise almost every day!  Your chances of reaching the age of 100 increases if you eat lots of fruits and vegetables, regular  exercise (5 days a week) and reducing stress, according to a Danish study.  The healthier you are, the better you feel. The better you feel, the longer you live.
  • Laugh.  Centenarians laugh or giggle nearly every day! Laughter is a powerful antidote to stress, pain, and conflict. Nothing works faster to bring your mind and body back into balance.
  • Socialize.  The majority of baby boomers and centenarians say that they talk to or communicate with friends and family nearly every day. Additionally, reading, crossword puzzles, games keep your brain challenged and more healthy.
  • Sleep. A good solid night of sleep helps to repair many cells in the body, and potentially add two years to your lifespan.
  • Relax.  Centenarians work at a job or hobby far less than boomers but the key is to relax and enjoy “down-time”.
  • Groom yourself. Centenarians maintain good oral health as well as continuing the habit of daily bathing or showering. Aging or less activity outside the home should not be good reasons for poor grooming habits.

Take good care of yourself and live a good long life!

 

 

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Retirement & Financial Tips for For Baby Boomers

Change is typically front of mind for many when the calendar flips to a new year. If you’re in the Baby Boom generation, chances are you are also in the so-called Sandwich Generation. What is the Sandwich Generation? It’s that crop of Baby Boomers that are raising children, pursuing careers and taking care of aging parents.

If you’re taking over the financial responsibility for your parents you may find strategies they employed that make sense and that you will incorporate. However, you may find that your parents simply didn’t plan carefully enough for the future and with the potential for nursing home or assisted living costs looming, financial conversations need to take place sooner rather than later.

As a 50-something there is no time like the present to implement a financial strategy for yourself and your family. What can you do today? Here are some strategies:

  • Understand how much you have “banked” for Social Security for when you retire. In the past the Social Security administration would mail out statements letting you know what your expected future benefits would be. They are no longer mailing statements but you can go online and see the amount you may collect when you retire. Go to www.ssa.gov. For many people, Social Security will not be enough to live comfortably on and that’s why there is the need to plan for future living expenses as you age.
  • Look at your budget and determine whether you can put additional money away in a savings or retirement account. Even a modest increase in savings can add up in helping your retirement be more fiscally secure. Don’t forget to ask your accountant how much you can deposit into a retirement account to adhere to the IRS guidelines.
  • Talk to a financial planner to see if you are on the right track for retirement. Do you have a true picture of your income and expenses? Do you know how much you need to live comfortably? Once your full time income is gone after you retire, where will you need to make cutbacks in the family budget and are those cutbacks items you can live with? You should know where your retirement income will come from and how much it is and compare that to expected expenses. If you plan to age in place you will also need to factor in home maintenance expenses and potential increases in utilities because you will no longer be out of the house at work.
  • Are your investments working for you? You want to have an investment portfolio that matches your individual style, whether you are an aggressive investor or whether you simply want your money to grow at a steady pace. Understanding your investment style, though will help you determine your financial status once you retire and begin living off of the investment income.
  • Determine whether it is worth it to you and your family to invest in long term care insurance. Have a plan in place for the time when, or if, you or your spouse can no longer live independently. Will you have the funds available to move into an assisted living facility that you prefer or will your finances force you to move into a facility in which you’re not happy?

If you’re in the midst of gathering up your paperwork to meet with the accountant and file your taxes, now is the ideal time to take a good, long look at your finances and make certain you are planning for your future.

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Tips To Avoid Caregiver Burnout

 

Research has shown that baby boomers, in unprecedented numbers are facing extreme levels of stress because they’re juggling duties of taking care of their own families, work and home and are being called upon to take on the role of caregiver for their aging parents. A study conducted by the Hartford Financial Services Group showed that 80% of baby boomers were reporting moderate to high levels of stress because of their caregiving responsibilities. It’s also been reported that many of these same individuals are being faced with the choice of leaving their jobs and careers to care for an aging parent; this leads to the baby boomer sacrificing his or her own financial stability, health and lifestyle to take on this role.

 

As a way to help reduce some of that stress, many of these adult children are turning to home medical alert systems as a way to help relieve concerns over the health and well-being of their parents during the times they can’t be there. These medical alert devices are worn by the aging parent and in the event of a slip or fall or other medical emergency, at the push of a button the device activates a two way communication device alerting the LifeFone Emergency Response Center.  Based on the personal profile set up by the user, the emergency response team will contact medical personnel and family members to provide assistance. These devices are especially welcomed by those adult seniors that are determined to remain in their own homes. The medical alert device provides peace of mind for both the aging parent and their family and caregivers.

 

When you consider that being a caregiver can feel like having a second job, you need to take some steps to relieve your stress while still making certain your aging parent is cared for. Here are some steps to take to relieve your stress:

 

  • Ask siblings and your children for help. Get as many family members involved as you possibly can.
  • Search out caregiving services in your area. Contact senior service organizations and your church to see what services are available.
  • Look into senior living facility options and gauge your parents’ receptiveness to moving into one of these facilities.
  • Invest in a medical alert system. Peace of mind can be had through the use of one of these devices.

 

Taking a day off from caregiving is also a great way to avoid burnout and stress. Plan in advance and then enjoy the day, both you and your parents will benefit from your taking a breather as you will likely come back refreshed and in a better mood!

 

 

Tips To Avoid Caregiver Burnout

 

Research has shown that baby boomers, in unprecedented numbers are facing extreme levels of stress because they’re juggling duties of taking care of their own families, work and home and are being called upon to take on the role of caregiver for their aging parents. A study conducted by the Hartford Financial Services Group showed that 80% of baby boomers were reporting moderate to high levels of stress because of their caregiving responsibilities. It’s also been reported that many of these same individuals are being faced with the choice of leaving their jobs and careers to care for an aging parent; this leads to the baby boomer sacrificing his or her own financial stability, health and lifestyle to take on this role.

 

As a way to help reduce some of that stress, many of these adult children are turning to home medical alert systems as a way to help relieve concerns over the health and well-being of their parents during the times they can’t be there. These medical alert devices are worn by the aging parent and in the event of a slip or fall or other medical emergency, at the push of a button the device activates a two way communication device alerting the LifeFone Emergency Response Center.  Based on the personal profile set up by the user, the emergency response team will contact medical personnel and family members to provide assistance. These devices are especially welcomed by those adult seniors that are determined to remain in their own homes. The medical alert device provides peace of mind for both the aging parent and their family and caregivers.

 

When you consider that being a caregiver can feel like having a second job, you need to take some steps to relieve your stress while still making certain your aging parent is cared for. Here are some steps to take to relieve your stress:

 

  • Ask siblings and your children for help. Get as many family members involved as you possibly can.
  • Search out caregiving services in your area. Contact senior service organizations and your church to see what services are available.
  • Look into senior living facility options and gauge your parents’ receptiveness to moving into one of these facilities.
  • Invest in a medical alert system. Peace of mind can be had through the use of one of these devices.

 

Taking a day off from caregiving is also a great way to avoid burnout and stress. Plan in advance and then enjoy the day, both you and your parents will benefit from your taking a breather as you will likely come back refreshed and in a better mood!

 

 

Caring For Elderly Relatives Means Treating Them With Respect

As Baby Boomers watch their parents age and become dependent on them for care, it is a difficult time for all family members. Many seniors may not be fully aware they are losing their faculties and it may be hard for them to be cared for when they’ve spent their lives as the caregivers.
Caring for the elderly, especially when it’s your own parents is a stress inducer. When the roles are reversed and the children are now in the role of caregiver rather than the ones being cared for, it’s awkward for all parties involved. Parents or other aging loved ones may not be receptive to the new interference in their lives and help in managing their day-to-day activities. To make a smooth transition from care provider to care recipient, show your loved one love and treat them with respect, even though they may be tough to deal with or due to health or mental status they may act like children.

In some instances, friction arises when you’re trying to convince your parents that they either need you to come in and help with housekeeping, paying bills, cooking, or even going so far as to hire in home healthcare aides. The conversations need to be approached with care and need to focus on your desire to help relieve some of the burdens and anxieties. Tell your aging relatives, in a non confrontational way, that you’ve noticed some issues with their health; chances are, they’re aware of it but simply don’t want to admit it.

If your aging relatives have suffered health issues, you need to work with them on age-proofing their home to address potential any slip or fall issues. Whether your parents are aware of it, individuals over the age of 65 are more likely than any other segment of the population to suffer a slip or fall accident which can lead to a permanent disability or even death. If they are determined to age in place, they will need to make modifications to their home and its design to make it more senior-friendly. You will want to do a thorough inspection of the home and check for any potential slip or fall hazards such as:

  • Loose or slippery carpets
  • Electrical cords in walkways
  • Items in cupboards that are too high to reach without having to climb on a step stool

Added safety measures include:

  • Equipping the bathroom with non slip carpets, hand grips and even a seat for ease in showering
  • Installing a home medical emergency monitoring system. These are great for aging individuals as they are equipped with a waterproof medical alert pendant and if they slip or fall or suffer another health emergency, at the push of a button help will be alerted and emergency medical personnel dispatched if needed. The use of home medical emergency monitoring systems allows many elderly to stay home for much longer and offers all parties peace of mind

Make your relatives a part of the solution when helping them age in their own home. Don’t simply come in, take over and make wholesale changes to their home and their lifestyle. Bear in mind, they are accustomed to being the caregiver and if treated with respect, they will be receptive to the changes you’re implementing and will be more likely to ask for help in the future.