Tag Archives: Elderly Care

Getting Over Your Anxiety to Visit the Nursing Home

Mustering up the willpower to visit your loved one in a nursing home can be a little challenging. Nursing homes have a bad rap when it comes to soliciting visitors. Oftentimes people complain that nursing homes smell bad, or that it is depressing to see so many elderly people in poor health with not much time to live. Loved ones often feel pangs of guilt for not visiting their family members in nursing homes and then experience more guilt for loathing the idea of visiting. There is no better time than the holidays to show your loved ones how much you care.

Like most things we dread, the prospect of visiting the nursing home is much worse than the actual process of doing it. More often than not you feel extremely gratified after visiting loved ones, and chatting with other residents truly lifts their spirit and consequently yours as well.

If you still need more of an incentive to visit your loved one, think of your visits as checkups to make sure that your loved one is in good hands and satisfied with his or her care. You can view your visits as a way to improve your loved one’s life in the nursing home, making their experience that much more enjoyable. By having a mission to accomplish with each visit you will begin to feel like your visits have a purpose and that you are using your time constructively.

  •  Come prepared with questions when you go visit your loved one. Allow them to reminisce on the life they led and regale you with stories from specific incidents. Ask your mother or father about their wedding day, about their profession, about their proudest moment, the list goes on and on. We often view our parents as entities that have existed as long as we have, but they had an entirely different life before you were born. Ask them about their life prior to your existence and about the incidents that occurred when you were too young to remember.
  • Bringing old family photo albums and/or music from your loved one’s prime are also ways to get communication flowing. Photo albums are especially significant among people with dementia, who can often recognize childhood faces even if they can’t remember the person standing in front of them. It is also a good idea to find out what kind of music your loved one liked to listen to. Bring in cds or your laptop to play songs that they will enjoy. Their whole mood will change once they hear an old favorite they haven’t listened to in years.
  • While at the nursing home you can also take the time to make sure that your loved one is being properly cared for. How fast does the staff respond to accidents or clean up spills? You can monitor how your loved one is being cared for and view how others in the facility are cared for as well. Confirm that the rooms have medical alert buttons like LifeFone, to ensure that help responds immediately.

When contemplating visiting your loved one in the nursing home the best motivation may very well be to put yourself in your loved one’s shoes. One day you may be living in a nursing home and you will want visitors. You will also appreciate it if your loved ones check up on you to make sure you are well cared for and happy. Next time you feel a sense of dread in regards to visiting the nursing home remember how good it actually feels to see your loved one and how satisfied you feel after you leave.

Connecting with your aging parents through technology

An increasing number of baby boomers are almost done raising their children, but are not done with caregiving as they’re turning their attentions to taking care of their aging parents. One way that caregiving has become easier is that many of the baby boomers’ parents are more tech savvy than in generations past. Technology is one way that caregivers can stay in touch with their parents when traveling to their home isn’t an option because of work or family responsibilities.

Many boomers find that setting their parents up with a computer so they can hook them up with cameras and emails and online video communication options helps them stay connected. Setting up a daily web chat or checking in through daily emails can help the family stay in touch without being in the same physical proximity. Knowing that there should be a daily email or web chat can offer the family peace of mind. As a way to add a more personal touch, caregivers can plan for a live video (web chat) during dinner. This is especially helpful if the aging parent lives alone. If you and your aging parent plan to “eat dinner together” a few times a week, it can break up the loneliness and also offer a unique way for the family to stay in touch. Additionally, having a live web dinner chat can assure the caregiver that their aging parent is eating healthy meals.

Equipping your aging parents’ home with a home medical alert system adds to the peace of mind. A home medical alert system also allows individuals to stay in their homes for a much longer time because you’ll know that if they fall or get injured, they can activate the medical alert button and help will be dispatched. While caregivers typically make long trips to their aging parents home to check on them, run errands and take care of household chores, the installation of a home medical alert system lets them know that between the time they make the trip to the home, their parents are being continually monitored and that help is only a button push away.

Medical Alert System Helps in the Event of a Fall or Serious Medical Concern.

Falls can have serious consequences. About 10% to 15% of all falls in older people will result in some serious physical injury.  Fractures occur in 5% of all falls while fall-related injuries are reported to be the fifth most common cause of death in the elderly population and the most likely cause of accidental death. According toYaleUniversityMedicalSchool, the chances of surviving are six times greater if an individual who falls is found within an hour.

Facts about falls

  •  More than one third of adults 65 and older fall every year in the United States.
  • Among older adults, falls are the leading cause of injury deaths. They are also the most common cause of nonfatal injuries and hospital admissions for trauma.
  • Over 1.8 million people 65 and older each year are treated in emergency departments for injuries from falls.
  • Most fractures among older adults are caused by falls. Continue reading

Medical Alert System Helps in the Event of a Fall or Serious Medical Concern.

Falls can have serious consequences. About 10% to 15% of all falls in older people will result in some serious physical injury.  Fractures occur in 5% of all falls while fall-related injuries are reported to be the fifth most common cause of death in the elderly population and the most likely cause of accidental death. According toYaleUniversityMedicalSchool, the chances of surviving are six times greater if an individual who falls is found within an hour.

Facts about falls

  •  More than one third of adults 65 and older fall every year in the United States.
  • Among older adults, falls are the leading cause of injury deaths. They are also the most common cause of nonfatal injuries and hospital admissions for trauma.
  • Over 1.8 million people 65 and older each year are treated in emergency departments for injuries from falls.
  • Most fractures among older adults are caused by falls. Continue reading

More Than Tough Love

It is no secret that people tend to be the hardest on the ones they love. Family members often shoulder the burden of their loved ones’ emotional rage, which is only amplified when that family member is also serving as the primary caregiver to their elderly parents. It is hard to discern why elderly parents turn on the child that is trying to take care of them, but often their anger is rooted in their circumstances, not the actual family member.

Our loved ones may realize they are not as mobile or active as they used to be, they may be experiencing a painful illness, they may be embarrassed  of their incontinence, or they may feel their memory waning. Whatever the cause, they often take their frustrations out on the ones they feel most safe and comfortable around. They are not consciously abusing their son or daughter, they are frustrated and take it out on family because they believe no matter how poorly they behave family won’t leave them.

When handling emotional abuse from elders, it is important to understand that your parent is frustrated, they feel as though their independence is slipping away and that death is fast approaching. As we age, we often feel betrayed by our bodies and feel humiliated for the help we require to simply survive each day. While our loved ones are undergoing a difficult time period in their life, it does not justify their negative and hurtful behavior toward their caregivers.

Detach Yourself from Insults

Although their insults may cut deep, it is important that you don’t take every insult personally. It is also important to be able to detach from the situation with love. If you are experiencing a particularly difficult period in your relationship, the best solution may simply be to take a break. If your parent is in a nursing home where you know they are receiving proper care, or you have a sibling that can take over the duties for a day or a week, allow yourself to get some distance. By spending a little time apart both you and your loved one will have time to recharge. As a caregiver, it is important to show your loved one that you will not tolerate being treated in an abusive manner, standing your ground often leads to better behavior on your loved one’s part. Being a caregiver is stressful enough without your care recipient bringing you to tears based on their poor behavior.

If your loved one lives at home with you, it may be a good idea to consider in-home care, finding a little respite will work wonders on your psyche. By detaching yourself from their care for even a short while, you may find that your parents gain a new appreciation for you. When you stand up for yourself, and remain kind, calm and loving, it is easier to get your point across. Your feelings are important, regardless of your loved one’s disposition. Taking a stand and letting them know their behavior is intolerable early on may save you a world of hurt throughout your caregiving journey.

 

 

 

Fall Prevention Awareness Week

Falls among the elderly is a serious problem and growing!  One out of three people over the age of 65 falls at least once a year.  According to theCDC, the direct and indirect cost of injuries from falls is expected to reach $54.9 billion by 2020!  Fall awareness and prevention becomes ever more important as our population ages.

Thankfully, many falls and fall related injuries can be prevented.  In an article called Making Your Home Safe for Seniors, we provided steps you can take to reduce the risk of a fall.

Fall Prevention Awareness Week is September 18 – 24, 2011 with many states taking part.  Fall Prevention Awareness Day, Friday, September 23 is an opportunity to become involved in your local area activities.  While activities vary by location, they include educational programs and home safety checks.

With autumn approaching at a fast pace, examine your home and those of the elderly to identify hazards. Consider risk factors such as poor eyesight, prior injuries that may cause walking problems, physical activity levels and other hazards.  As Baby Boomers age, the impact of a fall creates greater financial and emotional burdens. Education, examination and awareness is key to helping reduce the impact of falls and related injuries.

 

Fall Prevention Awareness Week

Falls among the elderly is a serious problem and growing!  One out of three people over the age of 65 falls at least once a year.  According to theCDC, the direct and indirect cost of injuries from falls is expected to reach $54.9 billion by 2020!  Fall awareness and prevention becomes ever more important as our population ages.

Thankfully, many falls and fall related injuries can be prevented.  In an article called Making Your Home Safe for Seniors, we provided steps you can take to reduce the risk of a fall.

Fall Prevention Awareness Week is September 18 – 24, 2011 with many states taking part.  Fall Prevention Awareness Day, Friday, September 23 is an opportunity to become involved in your local area activities.  While activities vary by location, they include educational programs and home safety checks.

With autumn approaching at a fast pace, examine your home and those of the elderly to identify hazards. Consider risk factors such as poor eyesight, prior injuries that may cause walking problems, physical activity levels and other hazards.  As Baby Boomers age, the impact of a fall creates greater financial and emotional burdens. Education, examination and awareness is key to helping reduce the impact of falls and related injuries.

 

Medical Alarms Provide Immeasurable Value

Given the number of falls, slips and accidents recorded every year among the elderly, it is little surprise that many of those who
survive credit their lives to personal emergency response systems. When seniors find themselves in extenuating circumstances, the key to their survival often lies within the medical alert service they subscribe to.

Imagine your loved one falling on the sidewalk or on their lawn unable to get to the phone or falling out of bed or in the tub.  These thoughts aren’t peaceful ones but they are potentially real for many senior citizens. When loved ones are home all alone and undergo a traumatic situation, there is little that brings as much relief than knowing help is available at the touch of a button. Investing in a personal emergency response system gives seniors peace of mind and the ability to remain living independently. Continue reading

Medical Alarms Provide Immeasurable Value

Given the number of falls, slips and accidents recorded every year among the elderly, it is little surprise that many of those who
survive credit their lives to personal emergency response systems. When seniors find themselves in extenuating circumstances, the key to their survival often lies within the medical alert service they subscribe to.

Imagine your loved one falling on the sidewalk or on their lawn unable to get to the phone or falling out of bed or in the tub.  These thoughts aren’t peaceful ones but they are potentially real for many senior citizens. When loved ones are home all alone and undergo a traumatic situation, there is little that brings as much relief than knowing help is available at the touch of a button. Investing in a personal emergency response system gives seniors peace of mind and the ability to remain living independently. Continue reading

Complete Home Safety, Even In The Shower

Feeling safe in your home means feeling safe in every part of your home, even while showering. Many elderly fear when taking a shower because of the awkward bathtubs they have to climb over and the slippery lining of many tub floors. The concern of not being able to reach help while showering is a frightful thought. LifeFone’s personal emergency response system allows peace of mind throughout the users home, even in the shower!

 

Feeling safe in your home is only as good as the medical alarm company a user works with. With easy installation, a football field’s length in response distance and top-notch customer service, LifeFone treats its customers like family! Continue reading